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How to lose water weight naturally

Gastric band Surgery In France How to lose weight naturally by losing water weight Water weight, also called edema, is very common and rarely a cause for concern. However, it may feel uncomfortable and can cause unwanted bloating or puffiness in the body. This article outlines simple, healthy lifestyle tips for tackling water weight. Fast facts on water weight: Water normally makes up 50 to 60 percent of an adult’s total body weight. Any extra water being held in the body is referred to as “water weight.” When water builds up in the body, it can cause bloating and puffiness, especially in the abdomen, legs, and arms. Water levels can make a person’s weight fluctuate by as much as 2 to 4 pounds in a single day. Severe water retention can be a symptom of heart or kidney disease. More often, it is temporary and goes away on its own or with some simple lifestyle changes. Ways to lose water weight There are a variety of ways a person can lose water weight quickly and naturally. We look at the most effective techniques: 1. Reduce sodium (salt) intake bottle of water with measuring tape Water weight may feel uncomfortable and cause bloating or puffiness in the body. An easy first step for beating water weight is to replace sodium-rich foods with low-sodium equivalents. Too much sodium, or salt, can cause immediate water retention. This is because the body needs to keep its sodium-to-water ratio balanced to function properly, so will hold on to water if too much salt is consumed. The latest Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend no more than 2,300 milligrams (mg) of sodium per day. An average American will eat over 3,400 mg every day. Table salt is very high in sodium, but 75 percent of the sodium people consume is hidden in processed foods. These include cheese, cold meats, bread, frozen meals, soup mixes, and savory snacks. Natural foods, such as vegetables, nuts, and seeds, are very low in sodium. Some foods can even reduce sodium levels, including bananas, avocados, and leafy vegetables. 2. Drink more water While counterintuitive, drinking water can actually reduce water weight. Dehydration can make the body hold on to extra water to make up for lack of incoming water. Water also improves kidney function, allowing excess water and sodium to be flushed out of the system. Adults should drink around 2 liters of water a day. Replacing sugary drinks with pure water is a great way to keep up with the body’s daily water needs. 3. Reduce carbohydrate intake Carbohydrates, or carbs, also cause the body to store extra water. When we eat carbs, the energy that we do not use right away is stored as glycogen molecules. Each gram (g) of glycogen comes with 3 g of water attached. Cutting down on carbs is a quick way to use up the glycogen stores, which means that the water weight will also be reduced. According to the Institute of Medicine’s Food and Nutrition Board, adults need at least 130 g of carbohydrates to function each day, but the average American diet includes much more than this. Common carbs include bread, rice, and pasta. Replacing some daily sources of carbs with high-protein foods, such as lean meats, eggs, and soy products, can reduce the buildup of water weight. 4. Supplements Vitamin B-6 and magnesium oxide can be effective natural remedies for fluid retention. These supplements work with the kidneys to help the body flush extra water and sodium from the system. Studies show that these two supplements are very effective at relieving the symptoms of premenstrual syndrome or PMS, including water retention. They can also reduce abdominal bloating, swelling in the legs, and breast tenderness. It is best for someone to talk to a doctor before taking new supplements, as they can have side effects or interactions with other medications. 5. Exercise Exercise lets the body sweat out extra water. This causes water weight to drop immediately after exercise. A workout also stimulates blood flow and improves circulation, which canRead more…

Why your body size perception could be wrong

Gastric band Surgery In France Why your body size perception could be wrong Sign in Log in with your Medical News Today account to create or edit your custom homepage, catch-up on your opinions notifications and set your newsletter preferences. Sign in Register for a free account For FREE No Obligation Information about the cost of Gastric Band Surgery in France Click here Or Click the Image Below to visit our Special offer Page to see if you Qualify for any Discounts Read more……>click Here<Read more…

Identifying risk factors for pancreatitis in children

Gastric band Surgery In France Identifying risk factors for pancreatitis in children Research Update Nov. 28, 2016 In the largest study of its kind, an international group of researchers found that genetics, birth defects, and ethnicity may play important roles in the occurrence of pancreatitis in children. Pancreatitis, or inflammation of the pancreas, is accompanied by abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and, in severe cases, permanent tissue damage. Pancreatitis can be acute (occurring suddenly and usually self-resolving after a few days) or chronic (long-lasting). In some cases, recurring acute episodes can lead to the more debilitating chronic form of the disease. While both forms of pancreatitis are more common in adults, they can also develop in children. However, researchers have struggled to identify the factors that put young people at risk for pancreatitis, partly because the most common risk factors for adults-gallstones and heavy alcohol use-are rare in children. The multinational INSPPIRE (International Study Group of Pediatric Pancreatitis: In Search for a Cure) consortium was established to investigate the risk factors and outcomes of pediatric pancreatitis. The consortium, which has enrolled the largest cohort of pediatric pancreatitis patients to date, collected genetic, demographic, and clinical data from 301 children (girls and boys aged 19 and under) with acute recurrent or chronic forms of pancreatitis. The most common risk factor for pancreatitis in children was at least one mutation in any of four genes that are known to be associated with pancreatitis-CFTR, PRSS1, SPINK1, and CTRC. Mutations in PRSS1 and SPINK1 were more common in children with chronic pancreatitis than in children with acute recurrent pancreatitis, which means that mutations in these genes may increase the risk of transitioning from acute to chronic pancreatitis. Another risk factor found was obstruction of the pancreatic duct, most frequently by a relatively common birth defect known as pancreas divisum, in which the pancreas is drained by two smaller ducts instead of a single one. Other risk factors for pancreatitis that were identified were toxic or metabolic factors and autoimmune diseases, but they were not as common as genetic or obstructive factors. Many of the children in the study were found to have multiple risk factors for pancreatitis, suggesting that the disease may result from a complex interplay among more than one factor. The researchers also found that non-Hispanic children were more likely than Hispanic children to develop chronic pancreatitis. In addition to identifying risk factors, the INSPPIRE researchers also examined the burden of disease in children with pancreatitis. They found that children with both forms of pancreatitis endured significant abdominal pain, along with a number of emergency room visits and hospitalizations. Children with chronic pancreatitis had a higher number of emergency room visits and hospitalization than children with recurrent acute episodes, underscoring the need to diagnose and treat pancreatitis early to avoid progression of the disease to the chronic form. Additional research is needed to tease out how these factors drive pancreatitis development and progression in children. However, overall, the results in this study suggest that there are potential ways to screen for increased risk of pancreatitis in children, such as genetic testing, possibly providing the opportunity for early intervention before the disease develops or becomes chronic. References For FREE No Obligation Information about the cost of Gastric Band Surgery in France Click here Or Click the Image Below to visit our Special offer Page to see if you Qualify for any Discounts Read more……>click Here<Read more…

Sitting down can build fat around your organs, study shows

Gastric band Surgery In France The potential results of how Sitting down can build fat around your organs, according to a new study. Besides the ever-so-annoying belly fat, there’s also a much more “invisible” – but just as harmful – kind of fat: one that sits around our internal organs. What causes this, and is it possible to get rid of it? A new study has some answers. Too much sitting down can build ‘invisible’ fat, says new study. For one thing, we need get off our tushies, and pronto! Sedentary time correlates directly with how much fat we build around our organs, according to the new study, which was published in the journal Obesity. For another, we need to exercise. The research shows that sitting has an even more harmful effect for those who don’t work out enough. You might be tempted to think, “Thank you, Captain Obvious,” but actually, few people are aware of the importance of body fat distribution and the fact that the fat around our organs puts us at serious risk of chronic illness. The new study was led by Dr. Joe Henson, research associate at the University of Leicester in the United Kingdom, who comments on the importance of the study, saying, “We know that spending long periods of time sedentary is unhealthy and a risk factor for chronic illnesses, such as type 2 diabetes and heart disease.” “Likewise, the amount of fat deposited around our internal organs may also predispose us to these diseases,” Dr. Henson says, and he’s not the only one. In a previous study we reported on, visceral fat inside the abdominal cavity was shown to raise the risk of heart disease. For FREE No Obligation Information about the cost of Gastric Band Surgery in France Click here Or Click the Image Below to visit our Special offer Page to see if you Qualify for any Discounts Read more……>click Here<Read more…

Effects of a Gut Pathobiont in a Gnotobiotic Mouse Model of Childhood Undernutrition.

Gastric band Surgery In France Effects of a Gut Pathobiont in a Gnotobiotic Mouse Model of Childhood Undernutrition. Uncultured fecal gut microbiota from an underweight donor confers weight loss on gnotobiotic mice We used anthropometric data collected from members of a birth cohort study (14) of 100 children living in Mirpur thana in Dhaka, Bangladesh, to define whether they were healthy or undernourished (table S1). Those with height-for-age z scores (HAZ) greater than or equal to −2 were classified as “healthy,” whereas those with scores less than or equal to −3 were deemed severely stunted. At 18 months, 30 and 25 children satisfied these criteria for healthy and severely stunted, respectively, whereas at 24 months, 27 and 20 children received these designations; the remaining children were classified as moderately stunted (HAZ between −2 and −3). A PCR-based screen for ETBF targeting all three fragilysin gene subtypes (14) was performed using DNA isolated from fecal samples that had been collected from these children at 18 and 24 months of age. The results revealed that ETBF was variably present between individuals and within a given individual over time, with a total of 25 of 24-month-old children having a positive test (table S1). In this small cohort, ETBF carriage was not significantly correlated with indices of linear or ponderal growth . We combined anthropometric and PCR data to select fecal samples collected at 24 months from two children: (i) a healthy individual (child ID 7114 in table S1) with a HAZ score of −0.71, a WAZ score of −1.49, and a WHZ score of −1.62 who was ETBF-negative at the two time points tested, and (ii) a severely stunted and moderately underweight individual (child ID 7004) with a HAZ score of −3.02, a WAZ score of −2.51, and a WHZ score of −1.34 who was ETBF-positive at both time points. Of the 35 individuals with a positive ETBF test at either time point, only this stunted/underweight child was positive at both 18 and 24 months of age. Fecal samples obtained from members of this singleton birth cohort were screened for parasites using microscopic methods (5); neither of the two donors tested positive (see Materials and Methods for details). To define the effects of diet and these two childrens’ gut microbiota on host biology, we generated three representative versions (embodiments) of the diets consumed by the population represented by the donors. To do so, we determined the relative daily caloric contributions of various selected ingredient types, based on a study by Arsenault and coworkers (16). Selection of specific food items as representative of each ingredient type was based on consumption incidence surveys tabulated by Islam et al. (17), and the results were incorporated into a database consisting of 54 food ingredients. We filtered this database to remove items consumed by <20% of households and categorized each of the remaining 39 items (see Materials and Methods for additional details). From the resulting diet ingredient matrix, we randomly sampled (without replacement) one item each from cereals, pulse vegetables, roots/tubers, leafy vegetables, fruits, and fish, plus three nonleafy vegetables, to populate three separate diet lists. Using the U.S. Department of Agriculture National Nutrient Database for Standard References (18), we determined the caloric information for each ingredient and subsequently calculated proportions required to match the predetermined contributions of each ingredient type. Food items were cooked in a manner intended to simulate Bangladeshi practices, and the resulting three embodiments of a Bangladeshi diet were sterilized by irradiation. This approach allowed us to generate several representative Bangladeshi diets that were not dominated by the idiosyncrasies of a single individual's diet or by our own biases. The composition and results of nutritional analysis of the three diet embodiments are describedRead more…

The 10 best fitness blogs

Gastric band Surgery In France The 10 best fitness blogs Sign in Log in with your Medical News Today account to create or edit your custom homepage, catch-up on your opinions notifications and set your newsletter preferences. Sign in Register for a free account For FREE No Obligation Information about the cost of Gastric Band Surgery in France Click here Or Click the Image Below to visit our Special offer Page to see if you Qualify for any Discounts Read more……>click Here<Read more…

Siderophore Vaccine Conjugates Protect Against Uropathogenic Escherichia Coli Urinary Tract Infection.

Gastric band Surgery In France Siderophore Vaccine Conjugates Protect Against Uropathogenic Escherichia Coli Urinary Tract Infection. Significance Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are primarily caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), and 1 in 40 women experience chronic UTIs during their lifetime. The antibiotic courses required to treat infections promote antibiotic resistance, and current vaccine options offer limited protection. We have pioneered a strategy using small iron-chelating compounds called siderophores as vaccine antigens. These siderophores are not produced by commensal bacteria and are required for UTI. The siderophore vaccines reported here are easy to formulate and reduce bacterial burdens in a murine model of UTI. This report highlights the untapped resource of bacteria-specific small molecules as potential vaccine antigens and provides a proof of principle for incorporating these compounds into multicomponent vaccines for the prevention of bacterial infections. Abstract Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the primary cause of uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTIs). Whereas most infections are isolated cases, 1 in 40 women experience recurrent UTIs. The rise in antibiotic resistance has complicated the management of chronic UTIs and necessitates new preventative strategies. Currently, no UTI vaccines are approved for use in the United States, and the development of a highly effective vaccine remains elusive. Here, we have pursued a strategy for eliciting protective immunity by vaccinating with small molecules required for pathogenesis, rather than proteins or peptides. Small iron-chelating molecules called siderophores were selected as antigens to vaccinate against UTI for this vaccine strategy. These pathogen-associated stealth siderophores evade host immune defenses and enhance bacterial virulence. Previous animal studies revealed that vaccination with siderophore receptor proteins protects against UTI. The poor solubility of these integral outer-membrane proteins in aqueous solutions limits their practical utility. Because their cognate siderophores are water soluble, we hypothesized that these bacterial-derived small molecules are prime vaccine candidates. To test this hypothesis, we immunized mice with siderophores conjugated to an immunogenic carrier protein. The siderophore-protein conjugates elicited an adaptive immune response that targeted bacterial stealth siderophores and protected against UTI. Our study has identified additional antigens suitable for a multicomponent UTI vaccine and highlights the potential use of bacterial-derived small molecules as antigens in vaccine therapies. Both the physical and financial burdens of urinary tract infections (UTIs) are staggering. Half of all women experience a symptomatic UTI in their lifetime (1). And of those women, almost half suffer a reoccurrence within the next year (1). In the United States, where the annual societal cost of UTI is likely underestimated at $3.5 billion (2), 4 million women have UTIs continuously (3). Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is a subclass of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) and is the etiological agent for 80% of all uncomplicated UTIs (1). In 2006, there were 11 million physician visits, over 1.7 million emergency room visits, and 479,000 hospitalizations of both men and women in the United States for UTI (2, 4). Altogether, these estimates place UTIs first among kidney and urologic diseases in terms of total cost. UTIs occur when bacteria, most commonly UPEC (5), contaminate the periurethral area and traverse the urethra to colonize the bladder and its underlying epithelium, causing cystitis (6, 7). If left untreated, UPEC may ascend the ureters and establish a secondary infection in the kidney parenchyma, causing pyelonephritis. At this juncture, UPEC can elicit serious complications, including renal scarring, septicemia, and death. UTIs are routinely treated with antibioticRead more…

Intensive blood glucose management for those with type 1 diabetes preserves heart health for decades

Gastric band Surgery In France Intensive blood glucose management for those with type 1 diabetes preserves heart health for decades Research Update Nov. 14, 2016 A long-term NIDDK study reports that keeping blood glucose (sugar) as close to normal as possible for an average of 6.5 years early in the course of type 1 diabetes reduces cardiovascular (heart) disease for up to 30 years. The landmark Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) began in 1983. The DCCT randomly assigned half its participants to an intensive blood glucose management regimen designed to keep blood glucose levels as close to normal as safely possible, and half to the less-intensive conventional treatment at the time. When DCCT ended in 1993, it was clear that intensive management had significantly reduced eye, nerve, and kidney complications, but at that time the participants were too young to determine their rates of cardiovascular disease. All DCCT participants were taught the intensive management regimen and invited to join the Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) study. EDIC continued to monitor DCCT/EDIC participants’ health, and overall blood glucose management has since been similar in both DCCT treatment groups. To study the long-term effects of the different treatments tested in the DCCT, researchers examined differences in cardiovascular problems, which can take many years to develop, between the former intensive and conventional treatment groups. After an impressive average 30-year follow-up, DCCT/EDIC researchers found that those who practiced intensive blood glucose management during the DCCT still had significantly reduced cardiovascular disease compared to those who did not, despite having similar blood glucose management for 20 years after the DCCT ended. Compared to the former conventional treatment group, the former intensive management group had a 30 percent reduced incidence of cardiovascular disease and 32 percent fewer major cardiovascular events (such as non-fatal heart attack, stroke, or death from cardiovascular disease), after 30 years of follow-up. These results were similar for both men and women who participated in the studies. However, the beneficial effects of intensively managing blood glucose during the DCCT appeared to be wearing off over time. Previously, after 20 years of follow-up, DCCT/EDIC researchers reported that the former intensive treatment group had a 42 percent reduced risk of cardiovascular disease compared to the former conventional treatment group. After 30 years of follow-up, that number had fallen to 30 percent. Even with this reduction in protection, these new data show that a finite period of near-normal blood glucose management early in the course of type 1 diabetes can have substantial beneficial effects on cardiovascular health for up to 30 years. Overall, this finding adds to DCCT/EDIC’s decades of evidence demonstrating how people with type 1 diabetes can dramatically reduce their risk for complications later in life by practicing early, intensive blood glucose management. References For FREE No Obligation Information about the cost of Gastric Band Surgery in France Click here Or Click the Image Below to visit our Special offer Page to see if you Qualify for any Discounts Read more……>click Here<Read more…

Weight loss breakthrough: Sunlight is key

Gastric band Surgery In France Weight loss breakthrough: Sunlight is key Sign in Log in with your Medical News Today account to create or edit your custom homepage, catch-up on your opinions notifications and set your newsletter preferences. Sign in Register for a free account For FREE No Obligation Information about the cost of Gastric Band Surgery in France Click here Or Click the Image Below to visit our Special offer Page to see if you Qualify for any Discounts Read more……>click Here<Read more…