Affordable Weight Loss Surgery Abroad

Is this the formula for reversing type 2 diabetes?

Gastric band Surgery In France Is this the formula for reversing type 2 diabetes? The first-year results of a clinical trial have shown that almost half of people partaking in an intensive weight management program delivered through primary care achieved remission of their type 2 diabetes without medication. A trial has shown that type 2 diabetes is reversible if weight is lost and kept off. The trial, which is called the Diabetes Remission Clinical Trial (DiRECT), builds on earlier work by co-lead investigator Prof. Roy Taylor, director of the Magnetic Resonance Centre at Newcastle University in the United Kingdom. The earlier work showed that a radical change in diet can reverse type 2 diabetes. The results of the trial, recently reported in The Lancet, suggest that remission of type 2 diabetes may be achievable through intensive weight management programs supported by routine primary care. The team’s findings revealed that after 12 months of radical weight management, participants lost an average of 10 kilograms (22 pounds), and that 45.6 percent of them went back to being non-diabetic without medication. ‘Long-term maintenance of weight loss ’ focus Prof. Taylor says that significant weight loss reduces the amount of fat in the liver and pancreas so that they can start working normally again. “What we’re seeing from DiRECT,” he remarks, “is that losing weight isn’t just linked to better management of type 2 diabetes: significant weight loss could actually result in lasting remission.” “Our findings suggest that even if you have had type 2 diabetes for 6 years,” adds trial co-leader Prof. Michael Lean, chair of Human Nutrition at the University of Glasgow in the U.K., “putting the disease into remission is feasible.” He says that their approach differs from the conventional way of managing type 2 diabetes in that it focuses “on the need for long-term maintenance of weight loss through diet and exercise and encourage flexibility to optimize individual results.” Diabetes is a global health problem Diabetes is a disease in which the body either does not make enough or cannot effectively use insulin, which is a hormone that helps cells to absorb and turn blood sugar into energy. In type 2 diabetes, the body’s cells do not react to insulin as they should, which is known as insulin resistance. The pancreas – an organ that produces insulin – tries to compensate by producing more insulin, but eventually it cannot make enough, and blood sugar levels go up. High blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, damages many parts of the body and can lead to severe health problems, including heart disease, vision impairment, and kidney disease. Of the hundreds of millions of people worldwide who have diabetes, the vast majority have type 2, which results largely from carrying too much weight and not being physically active. In the United States, around 90-95 percent of the 30 million people with diabetes have type 2. And while it normally strikes people aged 45 and older, an increasing number of children and young adults are also developing type 2 diabetes. Intensive weight management vs. usual care The first-year results of DiRECT concern 298 people aged 20-65 years old who were recruited to the trial between July 2014 and August 2016, and who had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes during the previous 6 years. They were attending 49 primary care or general practice (GP) clinics across Scotland and a region in North East England. The trial randomly assigned the GP clinics to deliver one of two treatment types: either a radical weight management program called Counterweight Plus, or adherence to current best practice guidelines. This resulted in 149 people following the intensive weight management program and a further 149 people following current practice (the controls). During the first 3-5 months, the participants on weight management consumed a total diet replacement formula that gave them no more than 855 calories per day. After that, theyRead more…

What are the possible benefits of MCT oil?

Gastric band Surgery In France What are the possible benefits of MCT oil? Medium-chain triglycerides are a type of fat that is found in certain oils and dairy products. MCT oil is a supplement made of these fats. But what are the potential health benefits of MCT oil?Many articles in circulation recommend the use of MCT oil. They claim that it can help people lose weight and that it has several other benefits. This article explores the health benefits of MCT oil, as supported by scientific evidence. It also considers the risks around the use of MCT oil, as well as where to source it and how it can be used. Overview MCT oil can be derived from coconuts, and is often used to aid weight loss or improve stamina. MCT oil is a dietary supplement that is made up of MCT fats, which are fats that can be found in coconut oil, palm kernel oil, and dairy products. MCT oil is mainly used by people looking to lose weight, or boost their endurance during a workout. Some supporters of MCT oil also claim it can improve the ability to think, as well as help with various forms of dementia. What are MCTs and why are they different from other fats? Fats are made up of chains of carbon atoms, and most of the fats in a person’s diet are made up of 13 to 21 of these atoms. These are called long-chain fatty acids. In contrast, short-chain fatty acids are made up of 6 or fewer carbon atoms. MCTs refers to medium-chain triglycerides that sit in the middle of the other two types. They are of medium length and made up of 6 to 12 carbon atoms. MCTs are found in coconut oil and are processed by the body in a different way to long-chain fatty acids. Unlike other fats, they go straight from the gut to the liver. From here, they are used as a source of energy or turned into ketones. Ketones are substances produced when the liver breaks down a lot of fat, and they can be used by the brain for energy instead of glucose or sugar. As the calories in MCTs are used straightaway, they are less likely to be stored as fat. This principle is the basis of the ketogenic diet, which many people believe is an effective way to lose weight. Potential health benefits of MCT oil There are several potential health benefits of MCT oil. Some of these are supported by scientific evidence, while others are yet to be proven. Each potential benefit and its available evidence is explored below: 1. Better brain and memory function The Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation have reported the pros and cons of MCTs in respect of brain and memory function, as well as their potential benefits for those with Alzheimer’s disease. But to what extent are the claims surrounding MCTs backed up by scientific evidence? A 2016 review notes that in three studies, the brain’s take-up of ketones in people with Alzheimer’s was the same as in healthy people. In contrast, the brain’s take-up of glucose was poorer in those with Alzheimer’s than healthy people. The reviewers also note that ketosis has a slight beneficial effect on thinking ability for those with Alzheimer’s. Ketosis is when the brain uses ketones for energy instead of glucose. More research is needed to say with certainty that MCTs or MCT oil can improve brain and memory function. That said, initial research is promising, and there is growing interest in the use of MCTs in this area. 2. Energy boost and increased endurance MCT oil may help to improve endurance, and provide energy for intense exercise. Supporters of MCT oil claim that it can help boost a person’s energy and improve their endurance when they are working out. A 2009 study found that consuming food rich in MCTs, rather than longer-chain fats, improved the time that recreational athletes could endure high-intensity exercise. This evidence is encouraging but too limited to conclude for certain that MCTs or MCT oil can improve exercise endurance, as one 2010 study notes. 3. Weight loss and improved weight management A popular claim that supporters of MCT oil make is that itRead more…

Exercise alone alters our gut microbiota

Gastric band Surgery In France Exercise alone alters our gut microbiota It is well established – and perhaps unsurprising – that what we eat affects the microbes that live in our intestine, collectively known as the gut microbiota. According to two new studies, however, exercise has the same effect. Two new studies suggest that exercise – independent of diet – can alter the composition of gut microbiota. In mouse and human experiments, researchers found that physical activity – independent of diet – alters the composition of gut microbiota in a way that increases the production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) that are beneficial for health. According to Jeffrey Woods – a professor of kinesiology and community health at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the co-lead investigator of both studies – their research is the first to show that the diversity of gut bacteria can be modified through exercise alone. The first study, which investigated the effects of exercise on the gut microbiota of mice, was published in the journal Gut Microbes. This study included three groups of mice: one group of mice was sedentary, the other group had access to a running wheel (the exercise group), while the remaining group was sedentary and germ-free, meaning that they did not possess any gut microbiota due to being bred in a sterile environment. The researchers took fecal material from both the exercise and sedentary groups and transplanted it into the colons of the germ-free mice. Exercise increased beneficial gut microbes As a result of fecal transplantation, the previously germ-free mice developed gut microbiota that had comparable composition to their donor groups. Interestingly, the germ-free mice that received fecal material from the exercise group had higher levels of gut microbes that produce an SCFA called butyrate, which is known to reduce inflammation and promote gut health. Additionally, when these mice were given a chemical that triggers colitis, or inflammation of the colon, the researchers witnessed a surprising response. “There was a reduction in inflammation and an increase in the regenerative molecules that promote a faster recovery,” says study co-leader Jacob Allen, who was at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign at the time of the research. Based on their findings, the researchers concluded that “exercise-induced modifications in the gut microbiota can mediate host-microbial interactions with potentially beneficial outcomes for the host.” But do these findings ring true for humans? This is what the team sought to find out with their second study. Differences between lean, obese subjects The second study – published in the journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise – included 32 sedentary adults, of whom 18 were lean and 14 were obese. The participants took part in a supervised exercise program, which involved 30-60 minutes of endurance exercise, 3 days per week, for a total of 6 weeks. Once the 6-week exercise program ceased, subjects were asked to revert to sedentary behavior for 6 weeks. Fecal samples were obtained from each participant before and after the exercise training program, and before and after the 6-week sedentary period. Throughout the study period, subjects continued with their usual diets. The researchers found that all participants experienced an increase in SCFA levels – especially butyrate – following the 6-week exercise program, but these levels declined when subjects reverted to sedentary behavior. With the help of genetic testing, the researchers found that the increase in SCFA levels correlated with alterations in the levels of gut microbes that produce SCFAs, including butyrate. Lean subjects saw the greatest increases in SCFA-producing gut microbes after exercise, the team reports, noting that their levels were much lower at baseline. Subjects who were obese experienced “modest” increases in gut microbes that produce SCFAs. “The bottom line is that there areRead more…

Battle of the sexes: Are women fitter than men?

Gastric band Surgery In France Battle of the sexes: Are women fitter than men? A new study shows that when women exercise, their body processes oxygen a lot faster than men’s. This indicates superior aerobic fitness, explain the researchers. In other words, women may be naturally fitter than men. When it comes to aerobic fitness exercise – such as running – women may outperform men, suggests new research. As society is making more and more progress in the sociopolitical realm of gender equality, there are fields where, in addition to equality and fairness, physical differences between the sexes matter a great deal. Athletic training is one such field. But new research challenges the traditional belief that men are athletically superior to women. In fact, by measuring women’s response to aerobic training, a new study suggests that the opposite may be true. The new study examined sex differences in the body’s response to aerobic fitness; more specifically, it focused on how sex affects the body’s ability to process oxygen once it starts to exercise. Thomas Beltrame, from the University of Waterloo in Canada, led the research, and the findings were published in the journal Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism. Women outperformed men by 30 percent As Beltrame and colleagues explain in their paper, the previous studies that have decreed men are capable of faster oxygen intake – a standard measure of fitness – than women were conducted in children and older adults. However, the matter had not been investigated in healthy young adults. So, the researchers hypothesized that in this population sample, too, the findings of previous research would hold true – men would have a faster oxygen turnover. Beltrame and team set out to test out their hypothesis. They recruited 18 healthy young participants; nine of them were male, nine female. All participants were highly active, with similar ages, weight, and levels of aerobic fitness. Participants were asked to engage in an “incremental cardiopulmonary treadmill exercise test,” as well as in three treadmill exercise tests of moderate intensity. The tests revealed that “the peripheral and pulmonary oxygen extraction dynamics were remarkably faster in women.” More specifically, women circulated oxygen in their body 30 percent faster than men, on a constant basis. In other words, women may be naturally more athletic. The hypothesis was disproven. Findings may change athletic training Richard Hughson, a professor in the Faculty of Applied Health Sciences at Waterloo and a corresponding author of the study, explains the meaning of the test results. “We found that women’s muscles extract oxygen from the blood faster, which, scientifically speaking, indicates a superior aerobic system,” he says. Oxygen uptake is a standard measure of aerobic fitness, and it describes the amount of oxygen that the body can take in and use per minute. As the American College of Sports Medicine explain, our oxygen consumption rate “provides a measure of the maximal ability to perform high-intensity aerobic work, is strongly associated with performance and health.” Therefore, a higher rate of oxygen processing means that women may be less prone to muscle fatigue and more likely to perform better athletically. They may also be more resilient, as higher oxygen processing also indicates a lower perception of physical effort. “The findings are contrary to the popular assumption that men’s bodies are more naturally athletic,” Beltrame says. Read more……>click Here<Read more…

BMI: A double-edged sword in your risk of dementia

Gastric band Surgery In France BMI: A double-edged sword in your risk of dementia An analysis of international data on more than a million people who were followed over time confirms two links between BMI and dementia – one ties midlife obesity to higher risk, and the other ties being underweight near disease onset to higher risk. New research clarifies how both obesity and lower-than-average BMI are linked to dementia. A report on the longitudinal study, which was conducted by researchers across Europe and led by University College London (UCL) in the United Kingdom, is published in the journal Alzheimer’s & Dementia. The findings may explain the mixed evidence on the relationship between higher body mass index (BMI) and dementia risk; there is some that points to higher BMI being tied to raised risk, and there is some that suggests the opposite. The reason for the confusion is because there are two things going on, says lead study author Mika Kivimäki, who is a professor in UCL’s Institute of Epidemiology & Health. “One is an adverse effect of excess body fat on dementia risk,” he notes. “The other is weight loss due to preclinical dementia.” This might explain why those who develop dementia tend to have above-average BMI two decades before disease symptoms appear, but nearer the time of onset, their BMI is lower than healthy counterparts who do not develop it. Dementia numbers rising Worldwide, there are around 47 million people living with dementia, an irreversible, deteriorating brain disease that progressively diminishes ability to remember, think, and live independently. The risk of developing dementia rises with age, and because of the rising number of elderly people in the world, global numbers of the disease are soaring. As there is currently no cure for dementia, or even treatments that slow it down, the already huge impact that the disease has on individuals, their families, communities, health systems, and costs will become overwhelming. Estimates suggest that by 2030, there will be 75 million people living with dementia worldwide, rising to 132 million by 2050. Alzheimer’s disease – a condition that gradually destroys cells and tissue in the brain – is the main cause of dementia, accounting for around 65 percent of cases. While estimates vary, it is thought that there are around 5 million people living with Alzheimer’s disease in the United States, where dementia is a leading cause of death among older people. High midlife BMI means higher dementia risk For their new study, Prof. Kivimäki and colleagues pooled and analyzed data from 39 longitudinal population studies. Altogether, the data covered a total of 1,349,857 individuals from France, Finland, Sweden, the U.K., and the U.S. All were free of dementia when they enrolled and underwent measurement of weight and height to assess their BMI. By searching hospital and prescription records and death registries, the studies had established that 6,894 of the participants developed dementia over 38 years of follow-up. When they analyzed the data, the team found that having higher BMI 20 years before onset of dementia was linked to higher risk of the disease. In addition, they found that the risk of dementia rose by between 16 and 33 percent for each five-unit rise in BMI. Five units of BMI are roughly the difference between normal and overweight and the difference between overweight and obese on the BMI scale. For a person of height 5 feet 7 inches (170 centimeters), this is equal to 14.5 kilograms (32 pounds). Do links reflect separate cause and effect? By contrast, the researchers found that the average BMI of those who developed dementia was lower in the preclinical stage just before disease onset compared with healthy counterparts who did not develop it. They conclude that when taken together, their findings suggest that the link between BMI and dementia is due to two separate processes: in one, higher BMI serves to raise disease risk long before symptomsRead more…

Your DNA may dictate which diet works for you

Gastric band Surgery In France Your DNA may dictate which diet works for you Despite dietary guidelines, public awareness campaigns, and people’s genuine efforts to lose weight, the obesity epidemic doesn’t seem to be going anywhere. Why is that? Researchers at Texas A&M University in College Station may have found the answer. Different diets may be appropriate for different people, based on their genetic predisposition, sugggests the new study. Whether or not a diet will work may be “written” in our genes. That’s the main takeaway of an elaborate study recently published in the journal Genetics. David Threadgill, Ph.D., of the Texas A&M College of Medicine and College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, is the senior investigator, and William T. Barrington is the first author of the new paper. Threadgill and his team started out from the observation that, despite national dietary guidelines, the number of Americans living with metabolic syndrome – an umbrella term for a group of cardiometabolic risk factors – has soared. In Threadgill’s opinion, this occurs because dietary guidelines are built on the false premise that one size fits all. “Dietary advice, whether it comes from the United States government or some other organization, tends to be based on the theory that there is going to be one diet that will help everyone,” he says. “In the face of the obesity epidemic,” he continues, “it seems like guidelines haven’t been effective.” Threadgill and his team hypothesized that genetic differences might influence how someone responds to a diet. The researchers tested this hypothesis in mice, which, as the authors explain in their paper, are similar to humans in genetic makeup, as well as in their predisposition to develop cardiometabolic illnesses, such as heart disease and diabetes. Different diets for genetically distinct mice To test their hypothesis, the researchers designed four genetically different strains of mice, to which they fed four different diets. The diets were designed so that they were the equivalent of four historically popular human diets: the American/Western diet, the Mediterranean diet, the Japanese diet, and the Maasai/ketogenic diet. The American diet was high in fats and refined carbs, the Mediterranean one was higher in fiber and included red wine extract, the Japanese diet consisted of rice and green tea extract, and the ketogenic diet was high in fat and protein but consisted of very few carbs. “We matched fiber content and matched bioactive compounds thought to be important in disease,” Barrington explains, in order to get the rodents’ diets to be as similar as possible to the human ones. The mice were also fed a control diet consisting of standard chow. The researchers monitored the mice’s cardiometabolic health, measuring their blood pressure, blood sugar, cholesterol levels, and looking out for signs of a fatty liver. Levels of physical activity were also monitored, as well as the rodents’ appetite and food intake. One size really doesn’t fit all Overall, the three “alternative,” healthier diets did seem to work for most mice, but the fourth genetic strain responded very badly to the Japanese diet. Although these mice “performed just fine on all of the other diets, did terrible on this diet, with increased fat in the liver and markings of liver damage,” says Barrington. As for the ketogenic diet, two genetic strains responded very well to it, and two very poorly. “One became very obese, with fatty livers and high cholesterol,” Barrington says, while the other had more fat and became less physically active, despite maintaining a lean appearance. “This equates to what we call ‘skinny-fat’ in humans, in which someone looks to be a healthy weight but actually has a high percentage of body fat,” explains the first author. As expected, the American-style diet increased obesity and metabolic syndrome in most mice. The Mediterranean diet, on the other hand, had mixed results, with someRead more…

How to lose weight by having sex

How can our health benefit from colder temperatures?

Gastric band Surgery In France How can our health benefit from colder temperatures? Winter’s here now, temperatures are dropping, and chances are that it’ll get even colder. All that most of us want to do is cozy up indoors with a mug of hot tea and a heartwarming movie, but do cold temperatures bring us any health benefits? If so, what are they? We investigate. Can the cold temperatures of winter do us any good? I don’t know about you, but I’m definitely what you might rather unscientifically refer to as a “summer person.” I thrive in hot weather, love wearing light clothes, and cherish the long, sunny days that make me feel productive. But in winter, I always complain about the cold, bundle up under five different layers of clothing, and grumpily wait it out until temperatures rise again. But am I wrong in being so dismissive of this season and the low temperatures it brings? Research has suggested that cool temperatures could bring a range of health benefits, and that we shouldn’t always shun exposure to cold. In this article, we give you an overview of some of these reported benefits. The cold can boost sleep quality Our bodies follow a circadian rhythm that self-regulates eating, sleeping, and activity patterns according to day-night cycles, thereby allowing us to function normally. Researchers have found that a dysregulation of circadian rhythms can lead to a disrupted sleep, which, in turn, can lead to a number of health problems. Studies that were recently covered by Medical News Today have found that insomnia and other sleep disorders can impair our perception and cognitive function and heighten the risk of kidney disease and diabetes. Research has revealed that, when we fall asleep, our body temperature begins to drop. Insomniacs, however, seem unable to regulate body heat appropriately, leading to difficulties in falling asleep. This is where external temperatures come in. One study experimented with “cooling caps” – that is, headwear that keeps the sleeper’s head at cooler temperatures – and found that insomniacs benefited from the exposure, which allowed them to enjoy a better night’s sleep. Current sleep guidelines – supported by existing research – suggest that the ideal temperature in our bedrooms as we prepare to go to sleep should be somewhere between 60 and 67 degrees Fahrenheit (around 15.5 to 19 degrees Celsius). The bottom line is that you shouldn’t be freezing cold, of course – that won’t really help your sleep – but moderately cool environments might do the trick. It gives you an appetite A study published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition seems to support the age-old claim that our appetite increases in winter, as the temperatures drop fast. “he present study revealed that small seasonal variations of daily caloric intake, diet composition, physical activity, and body weight are in fact present in normal individuals in the United States,” the authors conclude. Another experiment carried out in pigs, which have a similar physiological makeup to humans, saw that the animals also tended to eat less in higher ambient temperatures, but their appetite increased in cooler environments. Another study, this time exploring the impact of intense aerobic exercise and ambient temperature on caloric intake, found that being active in a cool environment stimulates our sense of hunger. So if you’re struggling with eating healthful portions, then a brisk walk or run in the cool winter air just before a meal could help to increase your appetite. ‘Fat is on fire’ If, on the other hand, you’re concerned that your tendency to eat more this season will lead to unwanted weight gain, worry not: the cold can also be used catalyze weight loss. Cold temperatures activate brown fat, the body’s heat-generating ‘fuel.’ Our bodies store two types of fat: white and brown. The former is often referred to as “bad fat,” as it simply accumulates. And, if it piles up excessively, it can lead to overweight or obesity. ByRead more…

The effects of skipping breakfast depend on your weight

Gastric band Surgery In France The effects of skipping breakfast depend on your weight How does eating breakfast affect fat cells in lean people? How about the fat cells in those with obesity? New research explores this by looking at the metabolic effects of eating – and skipping – breakfast. People with obesity may be better off having breakfast every day and with regularity, suggests new research. Does breakfast help you to lose weight, or does it have the opposite effect? Here at Medical News Today, we have been reporting on conflicting studies in this regard. For instance, one large population study that we covered suggests that a large breakfast helps us to avoid snacking during the day, which keeps weight gain at bay. Another study, on the other hand, suggests that skipping breakfast does nothing to affect our calorie intake throughout the day. But most of these studies are observational and cannot tell us much about the mechanisms behind weight loss, our metabolism, and breakfast eating. A new study, however – which has just been published in the Journal of Physiology – examines precisely such mechanisms. The research, which was led by Javier Gonzalez, Ph.D., at the University of Bath in the United Kingdom, examines how breakfast affects the metabolism and fat cells of lean and obese individuals. Lean people benefit from skipping breakfast Gonzalez and team asked 49 adult participants to either have breakfast or fast until noon, every day, for 6 weeks. Of the participants, 29 were classified as “lean” and 20 as “obese,” according to their body mass index (BMI). The participants in the breakfast group consumed 350 kilocalories within 2 hours of waking up, while those in the fasting group had no energy intake until noon. Both before and after the intervention, the team examined the patients’ markers of cardiometabolic health, their appetite responses, and their body fat distribution. In addition, they monitored the activity of 44 genes regulating key proteins, and the fat cells’ ability to use glucose in response to insulin. In lean people, skipping breakfast for 6 weeks increased the activity of genes that helped to burn fat, therefore improving metabolism. However, this effect was not seen in obese adults. Adults with obesity are often resistant to insulin, which is the glucose-regulating hormone produced by the pancreas. This new study revealed that in obese individuals, the fat cells could not take up as much glucose in response to insulin as lean individuals did. This effect seemed to be proportional to the individual’s whole-body fat. The researchers think that this is an adaptive mechanism in people with obesity, in which their body is trying to limit the amount of glucose their fat cells can take, so that it avoids storing additional fat. “y better understanding how fat responds to what and when we eat,” says Gonzalez, “we can more precisely target those mechanisms. We may be able to uncover new ways to prevent the negative consequences of having a large amount of body fat, even if we cannot get rid of it.” He also lays out some limitations of the study, saying, “Since participants ate high-carb breakfasts, we cannot necessarily extrapolate our findings to other types of breakfasts, particularly those with high protein content.” Read more……>click Here<Read more…

‘Alarming’ rise in cancer rates driven by diabetes, obesity

Gastric band Surgery In France ‘Alarming’ rise in cancer rates driven by diabetes, obesity New research crunches the numbers on diabetes- and obesity-related cancers and projects a steep rise in diagnosed cases. Scientists’ projections for diabetes- and obesity-related cancers worldwide are not at all encouraging. Researchers at several institutions worldwide – including Imperial College London in the United Kingdom and the International Agency for Research on Cancer of the World Health Organization (WHO) in Lyon, France – have recently established that cancers related to metabolic diseases, especially diabetes and obesity, have an increasingly high incidence. According to the team’s data, 5.6 percent of all cancer cases throughout the world in 2012 were linked to pre-existing diabetes and a high body mass index (BMI), which is defined as over 25 kilograms per square meter. Of this total, 3.9 percent of cases were attributable to diabetes – almost twice as many cases as were related to a high BMI. Lead study author Dr. Jonathan Pearson-Stuttard and colleagues also worked out the estimates for the probable incidence of cancers related to diabetes and other metabolic disease in the next few years, and their prognosis is not encouraging. The researchers’ study findings were published yesterday in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology journal. Diabetes, high BMI increasingly dangerous According to reports published last year in The Lancet, around 422 million adults worldwide live with diabetes, and 2.01 billion adults are overweight or obese. These numbers are particularly concerning, since diabetes and obesity are established risk factors for many different types of cancer, such as colorectal and pancreatic cancer, as well as cancer of the liver and gallbladder, breast cancer, and endometrial cancer. The more prevalent these metabolic conditions, the more concerned specialists become that the risk of cancers related to them may also increase. “As the prevalence of these cancer risk factors increases, clinical and public health efforts should focus on identifying preventive and screening measures for populations and for individual patients.” Dr. Jonathan Pearson-Stuttard “It is important that effective food policies are implemented to tackle the rising prevalence of diabetes, high BMI, and the diseases related to these risk factors,” he adds. The new study took into account the increase in the incidence of 18 types of cancer related to diabetes and high BMI in 175 countries between 1980 and 2002. Using data provided by GLOBOCAN, the researchers studied the incidence of 12 types of cancer across 175 countries in 2012, taking into account patient age and sex. Dr. Pearson-Stuttard and colleagues noticed that the majority of cancer cases that were related to diabetes and a high BMI – that is, 38.2 percent of cases – could be pinpointed to high-income Western countries. The second highest occurrence was noted in east and southeast Asian countries, accounting for 24.1 percent of cases. Low- and middle-income countries have fewer cases of cancer overall, but diabetes and a high BMI seemed to have a stronger impact in these regions. In countries such as Mongolia, Egypt, Kuwait, and Vanuatu, between 9 and 14 percent of all cancers were related to BMI and diabetes. At the same time, however, Tanzania, Mozambique, and Madagascar had the lowest incidence of diabetes- and weight-related cancers, pointing to stark geographical contrasts in terms of epidemiology. On a global level, the most common types of cancer from the ones targeted in this study were cancer of the liver (24.5 percent of cases) and endometrial cancer (38.4 percent of cases). In a region-specific context, 30.7 percent of cases were caused by liver cancer in high-income Asia Pacific. Liver cancer also accounted for 53.8 percent of cases in east and southeast Asian countries. In high-income Western countries, as well as in central and eastern Europe and sub-Saharan Africa,Read more…
%d bloggers like this: